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  Microsoft Flight Simulator 1 for IBM PC

          Flight Simulator became extremely popular, so no wonder that Artwick was approached by fledgling Microsoft that asked him to prepare a version for IBM PC. This package came out as Microsoft Flight Simulator 1, 1.00 respectively (user manual), in late 1982, and was signed by Bruce Artwick. The program was distributed on a 5.25” floppy disc and its start-up was very easy, because a computer booted itself from that disc. If you check the content of the floppy in some kind of explorer, you will find only one tiny file “fs.com” which also enables you to run the simulator. In fact, the main part of the program and sceneries were dispersed all over the disc in order to protect them from illegal bootleg distribution. This is also why Microsoft Flight Simulator 1 for IBM PC (as well MS Flight Simulator 2 for PC and subLOGIC Flight Simulator II for various platforms) are not as widespread as later MS Flight Simulator 3.0 and other successors up to these days.

           Microsoft Flight Simulator 1 for IBM PC offered four colours, but it worked smoothly only in computers with CGA graphic cards and “color composite” monitors (you can read about a color problem in a MSFS2 review). By that time numerous IBM PC clones had been produced and the compatibility problem emerged. It is suggested that Flight Simulator was often employed as an IBM PC compatibility test program. For example, computers with colour RGB monitors generated only a black/white picture. The stylized instrument panel of the Cessna 182 was fitted with 8 analogue circular instruments, fuel gauges and several digital instruments (compass, radio, etc.). Four sceneries were offered – Boston with New York, Los Angeles, Seattle and Chicago. There were nine views out of the cockpit, but in comparison with later variants external views were not available. It was possible to select a season, time, clouds, wind as well as other flight parameters. There were also 10 preset modes of which Europe 1917 (officially named World War I Ace) was a war mode that was a variation of the “British Ace” included in earlier packages for Apple II and TRS-80. It featured some improvements such as a cross-hair, mountains surrounded the scenery from two sides, and there were also more ground objects. In 1983 upgraded version 1.05 was released. It was almost identical to the previous one, but it had working “warm reset” via Ctrl+Alt+Del keys.

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1.00 for IBM PC

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1.00 for IBM PC (colour screen mode) - view of Chicago Meigs

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1 for IBM PC

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1.00 for IBM PC (colour screen mode) - World War I Ace

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1 for IBM PC

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1.00 for IBM PC (black and white mode)

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1 for IBM PC

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1.00 for IBM PC (black and white mode)

 

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Individual pages:

subLOGIC Flight Simulator 1 - Apple II

subLOGIC Flight Simulator 1 - TRS-80

Microsoft Flight Simulator 1 - IBM PC

subLOGIC Flight Simulator II - Apple II

Microsoft Flight Simulator 2 - IBM PC

Microsoft Combat Flight Simulator series

Microsoft Flight Simulator X

Microsoft Flight