PAGE F 51 58, /D 30 37/

A/ 8.16.4./8/.0    4 Ahau                               1,268,800 days

8                                                     8 days

B/ 8.16.4./8/.8 12 Lamat                              1,268,808 days

C/10.19.6./1/.8 12 Lamat                              1,578,988 days

D/ 9.19./5/.7.8   7 Lamat                              1,434,748 days

E/        9.16.4./11/.18 3 Etznab 1,412,878 days

F/ 9.16.4.11.3 1 Akbal 1,412,863 days

G/ 9.16.4.10.8 12 Lamat                              1,412,848 days

 

 

A/ J.D. 1,891,061 June 11, 465

B/ J.D. 1,891,069 June 19, 465

C/ J.D. 2,201,249 September 10, 1314

D/ J.D. 2,057,009 October 14, 919

E/ J.D. 2,035,139 November 28, 859

F/ J.D. 2,035,124 November 13, 859

G/ J.D. 2,035,109 October 29, 859

 

 

The multiplies of 11,960 days (2,3,4,5,16,17,18 and 39 times) and of 13,780; 71,880 and 371,020 days are added to dates B, C, D, E, F and G.

 

B/ June 19, 465 The summer solstice

 

There is an interval of 144,240 days between C and D dates. It contains (with little differences of few days): 

247 times Venus synodic circulation length /583.921 394 days/

642 times Venus siderial circulation length /224.700 800 days/

185 times Mars synodic circulation length /779.936 160 days/

210 times Mars siderial circulation length /686.979 800 days/

394.916 tropical years

 

The period of 394.916 tropical years contains the basic cycles of the Mars and Venus conjunctions:

 

305.352 years the first conjunction cycle

14 times 6.3974 years the second conjunction cycle

 

C/ September 10, 1314 Mars and Venus conjunction.

The Mars 197.76 degrees.

The Venus 187.99 degrees.

D/ October 14, 919 Mars and Venus conjunction.

The Mars 214 degrees.

The Venus 215.48 degrees.

The position of both the planets is expressed in degrees of geocentrical ecliptical co-ordinates.

The close approach (1.5 degrees) of the planets was visible, so the D date could be considered as an actual one. The C date is calculated 395 years to future. Therefore the mistake of 9.77 degrees occurred. The Mayan astronomers have been calculating only with the approximate values of the planets synodic circulation length. The approximate values make difference of several days in the end.

 

E/ November 28, 859 The newmoon.

F/ November 13, 859 The fullmoon.

G/ October 29, 859 The ring solar eclipse.

Beginning at 2.28 p.m. efemeride time

Maximum at 5.19 p.m. efemeride time

End 8.10 p.m. efemeride time

The eclipse maximum was visible at 11.19 a.m. local time in the Mayan area centre (90 degrees western length; 16 degrees northern width).

 

The multiple of 11,960 days is added to date G. It is the interval of solar eclipses counted by the Mayan astronomers. It is divided into shorter intervals of 148 and 177 and 178 days following in the tables in certain system. They contain the gathering of the Moon synodic circulation length /29.530 588 days/ and draconic circulation length /27.212 219 days/, which is the time, when the Moon on its way around the Earth crosses the ecliptic twice, this means a half of the draconic circulation length. In newmoon the solar eclipse sets, in fullmoon the moon eclipse sets. In 11,960 days, there are 405 synodic and 439.5 draconic circulations contained.

Adding shorter intervals of 148 and 177 and 178 days to the starting date G, we get dates concerning the Sun again. But after a longer period the mistake grows to 1 or 2 days or more. The Mayan astronomers were aware of that problem, so each theoretically counted number (in the tables) could be additionally enlarged (1 or 2 days) in frame of 260-days tzolkin. Comprehensibly, not each counted solar eclipse was visible from the Mayan region. 73 solar eclipses visible from different places on Earth occurred in 11,960 days starting from day G.

 

Due to adding intervals of 148 and 177 and 178 days, in some cases, the Mayan astronomers made such a mistake that no eclipse occurred. In spite of that they were successful in determining 63 solar eclipses very well visible in the Mayan area during the basic cycle of 11,960 days. So their method was quite right adding shorter intervals to the starting date G and creating tables of all seven expected eclipses. Their course, i.e. the beginning, maximum and the end, is expressed in efemeride time. The maximum is then expressed in the local time of approximate center of the Mayan area 90 western longitude and 16 northern latitude.

 

April 15,869 The ring solar eclipse.

The beginning at 4.47 p.m.

The maximum at 7.44 p.m.

The end at 10.40 p.m.

The maximum in the centre of the Mayan area at 1.44 p.m.

 

April 4, 870 The ring solar eclipse.

The beginning at 6.17 p.m.

The maximum at 9.22 p.m.

The end at 0.27 a.m.

The maximum in the centre of the Mayan area at 3.22 p.m.

 

May 16, 877 The complete solar eclipse.

The beginning at 4.48 p.m.

The maximum at 7.34 p.m.

The end at 10.21 p.m.

The maximum in the centre of the Mayan area at 1.34 p.m.

 

March 14, 880 The ring solar eclipse.

The beginning at 3.32 p.m.

The maximum at 6.28 p.m.

The end at 9.24 p.m.

The maximum in the centre of the Mayan area at 12.28.

 

August 28, 881 The ring solar eclipse.

The beginning at 11.49 a.m.

The maximum at 2.48 p.m.

The end at 5.48 p.m.

The maximum in the centre of the Mayan area at 8.48 a.m.

 

June 26, 884 The complete solar eclipse.

The beginning at 3.19 p.m.

The maximum at 6.02 p.m.

The end at 8.46 p.m.

The maximum in the centre of the Mayan area at 12.02.

 

July 27, 892 The ring solar eclipse.

The beginning at 11.44 a.m.

The maximum at 2.35 p.m.

The end at 5.26 p.m.

The maximum in the centre of the Mayan area at 8.35 a.m.

 

Precisely the Mayan eclipse cycle of 11,960 days is contained between October 29, 859 (the starting date G) and July 27, 892 (the last date). It could be compared to the Babylonian Saros of 6585.3 according to which the eclipses were foretold (since 6.century B.D.).